PBS' Yamiche Alcindor to Psaki: Why Isn't Biden Defending Maxine Waters? "She Was Obviously Not Threatening Violence"

PBS White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor asked White House press secretary Jen Psaki why the administration is not coming to the defense of Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA) after she told protesters to "get more confrontational" at a demonstration in Minnesota on Saturday. "I wonder why the White House isn't also coming to the defense of Representative Waters given the fact that she's now facing an onslaught of attacks especially by I would say Republicans," Alcindor stated. Alcindor came to the defense of the Congresswoman and declared that she was "obviously not threatening violence." "I wonder why the White House isn't saying we back what she said about being confrontational. She was obviously not threatening violence. There are civil rights leaders are saying that's what contra-- that's what civil rights is, it's to be confrontational, to be active," Alcindor declared. QUESTION: And apart from what the verdict might be I wonder if you could speak a little bit too Americans who feel on edge especially African-Americans who have seen so many verdicts, so many trials happen no matter whatever the outcome is I wonder if the White House has a message for people just feeling anxious about what comes after this verdict? PSAKI: Well, you know first I would say that you know the president sees their pain and understands or and tries to understand the trauma that people have been through across the country and he is watching the trial closely and I think he would want people to know that he is working hard at making change possible. And I can--I walked through some of the steps that has been taken by his Department of Justice, he would love to sign the George Floyd bill into law and that he also is here as a human being and he sees their pain, he recognizes their loss and their trauma and he wants to put reforms in place to help address it moving forward. QUESTION: And Speaker Nancy Pelosi came to the defense of Representative Waters, Representative Waters as you said clarified she said my actual words don't matter. I wonder why the White House isn't also coming to the defense of Representative Waters given the fact that she's now facing an onslaught of attacks especially by I would say Republicans. I wonder why the White House isn't saying we -- we back what she said about being confrontational. She was obviously not threatening violence. There are civil rights leaders are saying that's what contra--that's what civil rights is, it's to be confrontational, to be active. PSAKI: Well she also clarified her own remarks, Yamiche. And I think that's the most powerful piece to point to.

PBS' Yamiche Alcindor to Psaki: Why Isn't Biden Defending Maxine Waters? "She Was Obviously Not Threatening Violence"
PBS White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor asked White House press secretary Jen Psaki why the administration is not coming to the defense of Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA) after she told protesters to "get more confrontational" at a demonstration in Minnesota on Saturday. "I wonder why the White House isn't also coming to the defense of Representative Waters given the fact that she's now facing an onslaught of attacks especially by I would say Republicans," Alcindor stated. Alcindor came to the defense of the Congresswoman and declared that she was "obviously not threatening violence." "I wonder why the White House isn't saying we back what she said about being confrontational. She was obviously not threatening violence. There are civil rights leaders are saying that's what contra-- that's what civil rights is, it's to be confrontational, to be active," Alcindor declared.
QUESTION: And apart from what the verdict might be I wonder if you could speak a little bit too Americans who feel on edge especially African-Americans who have seen so many verdicts, so many trials happen no matter whatever the outcome is I wonder if the White House has a message for people just feeling anxious about what comes after this verdict? PSAKI: Well, you know first I would say that you know the president sees their pain and understands or and tries to understand the trauma that people have been through across the country and he is watching the trial closely and I think he would want people to know that he is working hard at making change possible. And I can--I walked through some of the steps that has been taken by his Department of Justice, he would love to sign the George Floyd bill into law and that he also is here as a human being and he sees their pain, he recognizes their loss and their trauma and he wants to put reforms in place to help address it moving forward. QUESTION: And Speaker Nancy Pelosi came to the defense of Representative Waters, Representative Waters as you said clarified she said my actual words don't matter. I wonder why the White House isn't also coming to the defense of Representative Waters given the fact that she's now facing an onslaught of attacks especially by I would say Republicans. I wonder why the White House isn't saying we -- we back what she said about being confrontational. She was obviously not threatening violence. There are civil rights leaders are saying that's what contra--that's what civil rights is, it's to be confrontational, to be active. PSAKI: Well she also clarified her own remarks, Yamiche. And I think that's the most powerful piece to point to.