September 18, 2019
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American Minute

  • A forgotten, courageous Founding Father

    John Langdon, first governor of New Hampshire John Langdon was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in 1741 and grew up as a member of the North Congregational Church, where his distant relative, future Harvard President Rev. Samuel Langdon was pastor from 1747-1774. Other notable individuals who had worshiped at the…

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  • Today's young socialists don't know our unique legacy

    "Done ... the seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty seven." This is the last line of the U.S. Constitution. Signer of the Constitution James McHenry noted in his diary (American Historical Review, 1906), that after Ben Franklin left the Constitutional…

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  • Pilgrim history: A mini-course in self-government

    'Signing the Mayflower Compact 1620,' by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris 1899 Sept. 16, 1620, according to the Gregorian Calendar, 102 passengers set sail on the Pilgrims' ship, Mayflower, with the blessings of their separatist pastor, John Robinson. Their 66-day journey of 2,750 miles encountered storms so rough the beam supporting…

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  • William Taft: A mixed bag as president

    William H. Taft He was the only U.S. president to be appointed Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. His name was William Howard Taft, born Sept. 15, 1857. After the Spanish-American War, Taft was appointed by President McKinley as the first governor of the Philippines, 1901-04. President Theodore Roosevelt…

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  • Bet you couldn't get into Harvard in the 18th century

    John Harvard's grandfather lived in Stratford-upon-Avon and was an associate of Shakespeare's father. His father was a butcher and owner of Queen's Head Inn and Tavern. John Harvard was born in London and baptized on Nov. 29, 1607, in the old St. Savior's Parish near the London Bridge (present-day Southwark…

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  • Liberal activists are wrong about national anthem

    Francis Scott Key after the bombing of Fort McHenry On Sept. 13, 1814, just weeks after they burned the U.S. Capitol, British forces attacked Baltimore, Maryland – the third largest city in America. Britain had the largest global empire in world history, controlling 13 million square miles – almost a…

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  • Local control of government: Just a pipe dream?

    Thomas Cooley The dean of the University of Michigan Law School was Thomas McIntyre Cooley, who died Sept. 12, 1898. Thomas M. Cooley was chief justice of Michigan’s Supreme Court (1864-1885), president of the American Bar Association (1893-1894), and the first chairman of the Interstate Commerce Commission (1887). Thomas Cooley’s…

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  • Islam's long war on the West

    Twin Towers on Sept. 11, 2001 Sept. 11, 1565 Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent dominated the Mediterranean, with intentions of not only invading Sicily, Sardinia, Majorca, and southern Spain, but Rome itself. The only thing standing in his way was the small rocky Island of Malta just south of Sicily, defended…

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  • We need this guy on the Supreme Court

    Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story His father was a Boston Tea Party "Indian." He graduated second in his class from Harvard, was a U.S. Representative, then was elected Massachusetts Speaker of the House. At age 32, he was the youngest Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court, appointed by President James…

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  • Christian California?

    Carmel Mission In 1535, Hernán Cortés explored the Baja California Peninsula, sailing the Sea of Cortés and founding the city of La Paz. In 1539, Francisco de Ulloa sailed around the Cedros Islands off the coast of Baja California. He was the first to call it "California," a name taken…

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  • Albania's most famous resident still inspires

    Mother Teresa A century after the Kings of Assyria carried away the 10 northern tribes of Israel into captivity, on the other side of the Mediterranean, Greeks settled the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea in the seventh century B.C. One of their major cities was Epidamnos (Dyrrhachium), founded in…

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  • Will the cradle of civilization become its grave?

    President Nixon cautioned to beware "that ... the cradle of civilization will not become its grave." The cradle of civilization included Assyria, a major empire located in upper Mesopotamia, which today is the area of Syria, Iraq, Turkey and Iran. Assyria was mentioned by name in the Book of Genesis,…

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  • Istanbul pogram: Example of 'a city gone mad'

    Istanbul, Turkey (Image courtesy Pixabay) Constantinople was the capital of the eastern Roman Christian world since Emperor Constantine in 330 A.D. It was conquered by the Muslim Sultan Mehmet II on May 29, 1453. In the fall of Constantinople, tens of thousands of Christians were raped, killed, enslaved or deported.…

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  • Fall of Rome: Are there lessons we can learn?

    Rome The fall of Rome was a culmination of external and internal factors. Great Wall of ChinaBy 220 A.D., the Later Eastern Han Dynasty had extended sections of the Great Wall of China along its Mongolian border. This resulted in the Northern Huns attacking west instead of east. This caused…

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